The Startup Magazine Universal Events Inc.: Motivating your Nonprofit’s dedicated volunteers in the New Year  


It’s no secret to anyone that Nonprofits depend heavily on volunteers to carry out their dedicated missions and create an impact in the world around them. Having said that, the challenge lies in keeping nonprofit volunteers not only engaged, but motivated toward working for the cause. Today, Universal Events Inc.’s professionals will provide some essential insight into strategies for keeping your volunteers’ spirits up and achieving great results.

nonprofit volunteers

“We hope that our accumulated insights will help you effectively manage a successful volunteer program and establish powerful connections with your nonprofit’s volunteers,” says CEO Harmony Vallejo.

The Significance of Volunteers for Nonprofits

Volunteers are a formidable force, with over 60.7 million adults in the USA and over 1 billion people worldwide who all contribute their time and efforts. This workforce can be mobilized at a reduced cost to your nonprofit, making it essential to harness their potential. 

Provided that Nonprofits often operate on minimal budgets, volunteers become essential when it comes to expanding the scope of your nonprofit’s work without going beyond your financial constraints. Once they’re adequately trained, volunteers can assist with a lot of essential tasks, including communications, fundraising, planning for events, and community outreach. 

Universal Events Inc. provides communications and back-end tasks, including insights into how to mobilize your volunteers. 

“Volunteers serve as a great source of credibility for your nonprofit,” says Harmony Vallejo. “Their willingness to work with your nonprofit reflects positively on your mission, and their word-of-mouth endorsements work as invaluable free advertisement.” 

Volunteers also benefit from their involvement, gaining a sense of fulfillment from contributing positively to their communities while also receiving great training and establishing connections that can help them in their future careers. 

Given the incredible resources they represent for nonprofit organizations, understanding the major motivation drivers for volunteers is essential. 

Respect their values

“While volunteers might not receive monetary compensation – their contributions add essential value to your organization,” says Vallejo. “Show appreciation through verbal thanks, written notes, or even emails. Feature their achievements on social media and put them in roles that align properly with their interests. Seeking feedback about their experiences helps demonstrate that you recognize and value their dedication.” 

Play on their strengths

Identify and leverage the unique skills and abilities of your volunteers. While administrative tasks are inevitable in most Nonprofits, align their strengths and specialized skills with your Nonprofit’s needs. During the volunteer sign-up process, make sure to ask about their strengths or skills, allowing them to choose roles that best suit their interests. This approach ensures nonprofit volunteers are excited by the tasks they’re assigned to, fostering a mutually beneficial arrangement. 

Connect work to your overall mission

Volunteers choose your nonprofit because they want to contribute to its mission. However, it’s also essential to explicitly connect their tasks to the broader impact and mission of your organization. By highlighting how their efforts directly impact the nonprofit’s goals, you can help increase their sense of purpose and motivation.

Keep things fun

“While volunteers are there to do a job, it’s possible to infuse some excitement and fun into the experience!” says Vallejo. “Incorporate opportunities for creativity, and always provide perks like snacks, coffee breaks, or even branded swag.”

Balancing a pleasant atmosphere with productivity helps prevent volunteer burnout and ensures that they enjoy the experience of working to assist your cause.



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